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20110301
20110331
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
'll see you in 30 minutes, cbs evening news is next. >> couric: tonight president obama warns the u.s. and nato are considering a military response to the crisis in libya as qaddafi's forces step up attacks on rebel-held oil towns. i'm katie couric. the violence is driving up the price you pay at the pump. but where's the money going? maybe not where you think, and should the u.s. tap the strategic reserves to bring prices down? they're here, the new 3-d mammograms. but should women be rushing to get one? and she's worn his m.i.a. bracelet for nearly 40 years waiting for the day she could remove it. that day has come. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. libyan government forces were back on the offensive today trying to retake more territory still held by the rebels. some of the heaviest fighting was in towns near tripoli and the u.n. says more than a million libyans now need humanitarian aid. president obama warned moammar qaddafi and his supporters they will be
qaddafi and his supporters they will be held accountable for the violence and the u.s. and its allies are still considering military options. today, nato plans began round-the-clock surveillance of libya. opposition forces in the east want nato to ground qaddafi's air force after it bombed several key oil towns today. mandy clark reports tonight from abbey ya. >> reporter: this is why libya's rebels are begging for a no-fly zone. we were the first journalists on the scene after this bombing. people ignored the danger and raced to show us the damage. he's hitting his own people with bombs, young children, he's killing them, this man says. just minutes ago we were driving down the road to get to the front line when a government warplane dropped two bombs behind us. the shrapnel from those bombs is still warm. near the craters, the wreckage of a pickup truck. a family with three children was in it when qaddafi's air force struck. two of the children died. the survivors were slashed by the slash nell. the circling warplanes made for a jumpy day on the front lines. do you find that even th
across the pacific to the u.s. reaching the west coast. japan declares a state of emergency at a nuclear plant as radiation levels surge. the area around it is evacuated. and the ring of fire. why this area of the pacific is so vulnerable to earthquakes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is saturday morning in japan. the sun is up and the extent of the catastrophe is becoming painfully clear. it's been nearly 24 hours since a powerful earthquake touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.9, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top 1,000. most of the victims drowned. nearly 1,000 are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that dama
are soaring and the area is being evacuated. most flights between the u.s. and japan have been canceled, and there were fear it is tsunami would pound the u.s., but by the time the waves reached hawaii and the west coast this morning, they had lost most of their punch. president obama said he's heartbroken by the disaster. u.s. assistance is already on the way to japan. lucy craft is there. >> reporter: the monster quake, thought to be the largest in japan's history triggered a ferocious series of tsunamis. a 23-foot wall of water poured over the northern japanese coastline with little warning. only minutes after the quick hit sweeping away everything and everyone in its path. cars were tossed like toys. boats were battered by the tides. this tanker was swept up on to the shore. another ship fought to escape a massive whirlpool. and the state of the boat and its crew is unknown. >> a tsunami obviously coming in several sweeps. >> reporter: minutes later a a second deadly wave. surging water overtook coastal city streets, ripping fishing boats from their moorings and swamping buildings.
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)